Animal Crossing Pocket Camp Guide & Information

Animal Crossing Pocket Camp Guide

Last updated on November 21st, 2017 at 04:37 pm.


This is a guide Animal Crossing Pocket Camp, available now! This includes a villager list, information on the best use of all the areas, walkthrough information and more!

Submit any questions or corrections in the Comments below and I’ll get to them as soon as I’m able! You can also hit me up on my Discord Server.

As always you can help support my writing and guides on Patreon!

Updates

Animal Crossing Pocket Camp Game Updates

2010-11-21: Global Release, Version 1.0.0! Launch bonus released and a couple special IAP packages. No other apparent changes to game files. It’s now safe to switch your Nintendo Account back to USA if you switched it to Australia for the beta, or to link your account if you avoided linking accounts before.


2017-10-25: First release, Version 0.9.0, test market release.

Game Info

Title: Animal Crossing Pocket Camp
Release date: 2017-10-25 (test market soft launch), November 2017 (Worldwide release)
Platforms: iOS, Android
File size: 348 MB fully updated
Developer: Nintendo
Genre: Life Simulation
Price: Free to Play with In-App Purchases
Always Online: Yes, persistent connection required
Battery drain: High
Mobile Data drain: Low-Medium

Animal Crossing Pocket Camp Mini-Review

Animal Crossing Pocket Camp is a surprisingly impressive mobile adaptation of the spirit and gameplay of the Nintendo classic Animal Crossing.

A good amount of the charm of the series is carried over with the decorating, collecting, and lots of the Villagers coming over from the main games. Many features have been paired down, such as conversations, Villager count, and the Bug/Fish species lists, but for the most part you can tell what was lost is a reasonable trade off in the transition to a bit more of a progression-based Animal Crossing.

The result is a good amount of the Animal Crossing charm so many love in a very accessible package (and not merely because it’s Free to Play) that compliments the main series well.

It’s not quite perfect; the friends functionality in particular is clumsy and frustrating in all sorts of ways, and the creepy threat of grinding and timers does whittle it down. However all in all, it’s a surprisingly enjoyable and reasonably faithful entry in the Animal Crossing series.

It’s no replacement for a mainline Animal Crossing, nor is it attempting to be. It’s just a good blend of what works in Animal Crossing with what works on Mobile, with a largely acceptable monetization layer that does slow you down but doesn’t beg nor force you to pay.

Gameplay

Starting Animal Crossing Pocket Camp

Most of the decisions you make here can be changed later or don’t matter in the long term, so don’t worry too much. The tutorial will get you going pretty easily, and locks most features of the game until you’re “ready”. I’ll provide some basic info here for people curious about Pocket Camp, but you shouldn’t need to worry too much about this.

Character Creation/Face Guide

Unlike early AC games, your response to the questions in the intro isn’t going to cryptically determine your character’s face or anything, so don’t worry about what you pick.

You can change your face and hair for free at any time in the Settings menu. The only thing that’s permanent is your gender, which does however limit your face/hair styles. Unlike other Animal Crossing games, you can’t get “pixie haircuts” (opposite gender styles) in Pocket Camp.

Your gender basically determines your eye/hair choices and that’s it; you can still wear dresses/pants regardless of gender.

Themes

Next, you’ll pick your name and a Theme from one of four presets. You get a preview of which items and starter character you’ll get and the option to back out, so just pick the items or Villager that you like the most.

What theme you get is basically just a starter kit, you can still obtain all items or villagers regardless.

Natural
A typical, outdoorsy Camp.
Starting villager: Goldie

Cute
A ‘girly’ cute camp with pink, hearts, and things of that variety.
Starting villager: Rosie

Sporty
Sports. Ball? Muscles. Pool? Rrrrr yes.
Starting villager: Jay

Cool
Modern theme items, guitars, live entertainment, chill vibes.
Starting villager: Apollo

Crafting

Right after picking your basic setup Animal Crossing Pocket Camp introduces you to everyone’s favorite monetization excuse gameplay mechanic, Crafting! Grab your animal friend some fruit and scour the area for the rest of the fruit while you’re at it (they’ll ask for it anyway).

Trees have a 3-hour timer (actually less than normal Animal Crossing!) and you can hold a very large amount of items in Pocket Camp, so grab all you can and get your crafting materials from your Villager.

Next, you’ll meet the craft shop: Re-Tail on the Road, with everyone’s favorite gender-color-coded alpacas, Reese & Cyrus! You’ll craft an item matching your Theme and learn that each item’s Theme effects which characters prefer it, it’s sort of like a simplified version of Villager personalities in the main series (snooty, sporty, etc) mixed into furniture preferences.

Pocket Camp introduces you to Leaf Tickets, the premium currency. As always in mobile games, speeding up timers/cooldowns is almost always the absolute worst way to spend premium currency. Don’t get tempted to spend them in the main game, but for the tutorial, you’re required to spend one (they gotta hook you on the microtransactions after all!).

Finishing the Tutorial

As expected, decoration has a variation on Happy Home Designer’s nice decorating UI. There’s nothing too complicated here.

After setting up your camp, you’ll have to download the latest update to finish installing Animal Crossing Pocket Camp Note that the downloading screen is a minigame; tap to jump and collect Bells and you’ll keep them for real.

You’ll get your first Login Bonus too, which seem to go by day and month separately? Next, you’ll head off to invite more characters to the campsite.

Now you’re exiting the “hard” tutorial that restricts you and entering a “soft” tutorial where you have much more freedom and Pocket Camp’s gameplay menus are now open to you. Keep following the tutorial to learn more about the game, but you can also explore the menus to see how everything works now.

Walkthrough

Quick Tips

No, you don’t need to spend money. You get about 900 Leaf Tickets for free from playing the game normally, which is plenty to get the Permanent upgrades they offer.

Yes, skipping timers is an extreme money sink, but skipping timers would be so hilariously expensive it doesn’t seem like a real option anyone would ever do. We’re talking several hundred dollars to skip a few days worth of waiting. Just wait, the game is slow anyway—this is Animal Crossing we’re talking about here!

There’s not much you can do wrong; the only “consumable” items you need to worry about are Sparkle Stones, Leaf Tickets, and to a lesser extent Essences. You’ll never “mess up” by spending Bells or Common Crafting materials “irresponsibly”. But do shoot for one of each crafting item before you go too nuts, and emphasize Amenities over cosmetic crafting items.

Adding friends isn’t necessary, but it can help due to Shovelstrike Quarry and making it easier to sell your Market Box goods.

Early Game

Estimated Playtime: A few days

Your very first goal is to Invite the starter animals (Rosie, Goldie, etc) to your camp. You can invite all animals in the game and you’ll never “lock out” any kind of content by choosing villagers, crafting items, amenities,etc. So focus on befriending and inviting villagers, and also on getting to level 10 as soon as you can.

You level up by befriending animals, so your two goals feed into each other nicely. Every new Villager you unlock starts at level 0, and is thus easy to get several Experience points from early on, so focus on lower level Animals when given the option.

The Stretch Goals will also reward you for learning the game mechanics, so take on every Goal you can. A few won’t be possible until farther down the road however, such as the Kiddie Set one.

You should pretty much always be crafting items at this stage. Prioritize “requested items” that Animals request before they’ll accept your invite, but if you simply go for one of each Crafting Item in the shop (excluding wallpapers/floors), starting with the cheapest items, you’ll be in pretty much good shape. I’d say about 75%+ of the items are required in the long run.

Also, as soon as you’re able, you’ll want to start crafting the Amenities in the “tent” tab of the Crafting menu. You’ll want one of each Tent to raise the Friendship Caps on your animals. Amenities raise the cap permanently so there’s no need to “focus” on one theme; instead, build one of each, then upgrade each to max, then work on the next tier of amenities, etc.

Save your Leaf Tickets for unlocking Crafting Slots at Cyrus’s. Once you have all 3 crafting slots you can spend the rest as you please, but I strongly recommend expanding your Collected Items inventory (tap the plus sign at the end of your items), or getting the cosmetics. Spending tickets to speed up crafting or forgo crafting materials is short term gain for a long term loss.

You’ll want to use Shovelstrike Quarry whenever you can get in with help from Friends, and while early on this will seem silly, but you’ll want to focus on getting Essences from it. You’ll get way more of them than you need now, but once you get to “Late Game” you’ll be able to proceed much more freely if you farm up Essences early on. Shoot for an even mix of all 4.

Once you’ve invited your first 8 Villagers to your camp and you’re level 10-15, you know the ropes decently and can be said to be in the “mid game”.

Mid Game

Estimated Playtime: A couple weeks

Once you’ve invited 8 Villagers to your Camp you’ll find you now have to rotate villagers out as the max you can keep Hosted is 8. You can move them around at any time with the Cat icon when at the camp.

Once you hit level 35 there are no more Animals left to unlock, so you’ll be on the last stretch of characters to invite to your camp (which will also roughly mark the end of “mid game”).

Your next goal is to start creating the Tier 2 Amenities and get your Animals to Level 10 as quickly as you can. Crafting the Amenities will raise the Friendship Cap to 15 which gives you plenty of breathing room, and by leveling Animals to 10 they’ll give double Crafting Materials for Requests and Gifts at the camp, greatly improving your ability to craft, invite other villagers, and make the remaining Amenities.

Even if your Animals hit the new cap of 15, they’ll give 3x the base materials instead of the 2x they do at level 10, so never worry too much about hitting the cap.

You’ll find at this point that levels for your character are a bit harder to come by; new Animals are more important than ever as the first few levels they quickly earn will raise your own Character Level that much faster. You’ll also notice that crafting all the requested furniture to invite some of the new Animals can be quite a task, requiring many materials; this is why leveling Animals to 10 is so important.

At this point you could always be working towards inviting the Animals you can’t Host yet, and you should always be building some manner of Amenity to avoid wasting time. Time is a big limitation for Amenities.

You should probably start expanding your Camper at this point if you haven’t already, and if you care about the interior decorating aspect of Animal Crossing. It doesn’t technically matter at all gameplay-wise, but if you enjoy it, it’s quite fun and you’ll now have a decent breadth of things to work with.

Late Game

Estimated Playtime: 2-3 weeks for the remaining Amenities

Once you’re inviting the very last few Villagers and you’re about to start making the Tier 3 Amenities like the Merry-go-Round, you’re at pretty much the end of the main progression curve.

You’ll still have loans to pay off, things to craft, but the game doesn’t change much at this point. You won’t be limited by Common Crafting Resources almost at all anymore, but Essences and to an extent Sparkle Stones put a limit on what you can do.

At this point you’re largely free to play as you like; you know the ropes and there isn’t much you can even do ‘wrong’. It’s a good time to expand your camper and really go nuts with furniture for your camp and camper.

A long-term goal you can go for is completing Animals’ Special Requests: items they ask for at either level 10 or 15 that cost 10,000 Bells, 150 Materials, some Essences and 2 Sparkle Stones each to craft.

Despite being very expensive they have a very tepid reward of 10 Friendship points plus a calling card and request ticket. Treat these expensive Crafting items as their own reward, crafting them is hardly vital but can be seen as a completionist goal.

Leveling

Player Levels are earned based on how many Friendship Levels you’ve accumulated; Friendship Points don’t directly contribute to Player Level, but each Friendship Level that’s gained will add experience to your Player Level.

Player Level unlocks many major features, giving you some money, a new set of things to Craft, and new Villagers to recruit. Max level at least 50 or more. You earn 1,000 Bells and 10 Leaf Tickets every level up.

Level cost starts at 5 Friendship levels, then rises to 8 around level 10 and is 10 for a while. Starting at level 26 the cost rises to 12 and continues rising again past 35.

Level 7
1000 Bells
10x Leaf Tickets

Level 8
Friendship levels needed: 5

Level 21:
Friendship needed: 10

Level 29:
Friendship needed: 10
New Villager

42, 43:
18 Points

44: 20 Points

45: 20 Points
1 Request Ticket

Friends

By sharing in-game Friend Codes or connecting Twitter/Facebook, you can play (to an extent) with Friends. Playing with friends is all asynchronous, so you can do these functions while they’re offline.

Friends can view each other’s Market Boxes and buy the items there, visit each other’s campsites, and send Kudos. Sending Kudos seems to do nothing in particular for either party, but it shows up in the receiving party’s notifications kind of like a “Like” on Facebook, and sending them is involved in some Goals.

People in your Friends list (and random people who aren’t) will show up at the Collection areas as well. You can talk to them, see/buy from their Market Boxes, or even go into their Camper while they’re in these locations. You can also send a Friend Request if a non-Friend shows up, so even people without friends playing Animal Crossing Pocket Camp can fill up their Friends list!

The Friends List appears to have a maximum of 100 Friends. The Friends List is sorted by the last login time of the players. Having a large number of Friends is recommended to make getting into Shovelstrike Quarry easy, and it also means more people to buy from your Market Boxes.

Market Boxes

You earn Market Box slots every few levels or buy them for 10 Leaf Tickets each (which I don’t recommend). Market Boxes let you sell Collected Items to other real players, and items placed in them can’t be recovered; beware overpricing items, as if they don’t sell you may have to dispose of the item to list something else in its place.

You can sell your items faster by undercutting the defaults the game offers; the 100/1,000 it chooses for you almost guarantees no one will buy your item. The problem is Market Boxes have low visibility (only previewing 4 random items in the Friends List) so it seems very few people end up buying things.

I usually sell items for 50 Bells or so per Common instead of 100 as the game suggests by default. Rare fish/bugs are particularly hard to sell, I usually sell those at 300 and they can still take whole days for my 100 friends + strangers to even buy one.

Boxes can have up to 10 of a single type of item. It’s better to sell your excess Commons at a lowish price to real players than to sell them to the game for only 10 Bells each. There is a minimum and maximum price Pocket Camp will allow any given set of items to go for.

I wouldn’t ever try selling items in Market Boxes unless your inventory is full; due to how Requests work, you’ll always need more of X. The major exception is the extra fruits you get at Lost Lure Creek. These are particularly good Market Box fodder as they’re fruits that are common for you but may be uncommon for others!

Cooldown Timers/Resets

By standard Mobile Game logic (and not entirely dissimilar to normal Animal Crossing!), various things in the game “reset” after a certain period of time. You may find yourself running out of things to do until you wait for certain resets to happen, so it’s good to take breaks.

All timers in the game and in the guide are in real time, based on your device’s clock. Animal Crossing has a habit of being vindictive if you alter the clock so I wouldn’t even try it, especially in an always-online game, but if anyone knows what happens if you mess with the clock, do let me know.

Exact times of Primary Reset and Daily Reset seem to vary by timezone (possibly only due to the Australia-only test release), so the times given are only for reference starting at Midnight and may be offset from the times you see in game.

Primary Reset

This is the big one, every 3 hours starting at 12 AM, the non-Hosted Villagers will ‘reset’. This means there will be a new set of Villagers in Lost Lure Creek, Breezy Hollow, Sunburst Island, and Saltwater Shores. There will only ever be exactly one Villager per location each Reset, selected from your selection of non-Hosted villagers. Shovelstrike Quarry will also change its material

You can tell when the next Primary Reset will occur based on the “moving in” timer when you view a location.  The game will briefly reload if you’re playing while the clock switches over to a new Reset.

Market Reset

The Market Place items rotate every two Primary Resets, so new items will be offered at 12 AM, 6 AM, 12 PM, and 6 PM. I believe OK Motors’ paint jobs cycle on the same timer.

Daily Reset

Every day at 12 AM is a new “day” for the purpose of the game. This matters for Log-In Bonuses well as your Timed Goals. Every day a single random non-fruit tree will also drop 300-1,000 Bells if shaken. You also can only use so many Calling Cards or Request Tickets per Villager per day. Shovelstrike Quarry can also only be entered once per day with help from friends.

Invisible Resets

These are less clear and function based on when you last harvested a resource rather than a predefined point in the day.

  • Fruit Trees
    • 3 hours after the last harvest
    • Visible cooldown, reset with Fertilizer
  • Fish/Bugs/Seashells
    • You can harvest about 2 full “screens” worth of items, then the items will slowly respawn at a rate of something like 1 item per minute. Unsure of the exact timings on this one.
    • Invisible cooldown, no method to reset.
  • Campsite Hosted Villager conversations/requests
    • Red Text conversations refresh an hour after last using them
    • Three random Hosted villagers will have requests every hour or so as well
    • Swapping campsite members does not reset or affect the cooldown, swapped in members will always have to wait for the next reset to be talked to
Crafting Timers

Crafting of course has it’s own timers, each object having a specific time it takes to craft. Items range between a minute to 48 hours (and possibly more!) to craft.

There’s not much that can be done about these timers other than waiting or burning a Leaf Ticket per 10 minutes left on the timer. It would cost $40+ just to burn through the first levels of each of the tier 2 Amenities, and that’s not even the half of it! I strongly recommend against paying to reduce the timers.

Times of Day

Time of day is currently cosmetic, but also affects animal dialog. I’m trying to find all the distinct “times” in the game.

5 PM – Sunset
7 PM – Night

Seasons

The game appears to run through Seasons just like normal Animal Crossing games. At present nothing is yet Seasonal, but I thought this was worth noting. Dataminers have confirmed the game does in fact refer to some Winter/Summer/Spring textures already.

Locations

Market Place

Here you’ll find two sales plots for furniture and clothing. Anything sold here is only sold here, not crafted.

You can also talk to Isabelle here and get basic information about Pocket Camp’s features from her Beginner’s Guide. The Market Place rotates it’s items every 6 hours, at 1 AM, 7 AM, 1 PM, and 7 PM (every two 3 hour refreshes).

Tommy & Timmy Nook
3 Furniture items

Labelle
3 Hats/Accessories

Mable
3 Shirts/Dresses

Kicks
3 Shoes/socks

Lost Lure Creek

Shovelstrike Quarry

One of the more initially confusing locations is Shovelstrike Quarry. Here you play a minigame where you hit 5 rocks with shovels and get random Gems which are automatically converted into Materials and Bells. There is no skill involved at all; the gem locations are totally random.

Shovelstrike Quarry Rewards

The Material reward changes every 3 hours with the Primary Reset and can be any Common Crafting Material (Wool, Wood, etc), any Essence, or Bells. Non-Bell rewards will still produce an amount of Bells; certain Gems seem to reward Bells instead of Materials, but again it’s all random so you have no control over that.

Super rough payout possibilities:

Common Crafting Materials: 2-16
Essence: 1-10
Bells: 3,000-5,000

The best use of Shovelstrike Quarry is to farm Essences, as it’s the only fairly reliable source of them; you’ll stop being limited by Common Crafting Materials after a couple weeks and there’s many other ways to earn Bells, but few ways to get Essences. To make the Tier 3 Amenities it’s basically required that you use Shovelstrike Quarry.

Sometimes the material icon will sparkle, this indicates you’ll find a much higher amount of Silver and Gold Nuggets, meaning you’ll always be close to the maximum possible reward.  The cap appears to be the same for both sparkling and non-sparkling icon, but non-sparkling icons may receive as little as 1/10th the cap (but a decent amount of bells instead).

Getting In To Shovelstrike Quarry

To enter the Quarry you can either pay 20 Leaf Tickets ($1, also the cost of a single essence in crafting) or get help from 5 Friends. You can only reap a single reward per day with Friends’ help, but you can pay 20 Leaf Tickets every 3 hour Primary Reset if you want to and have the leaves.

Requesting help is simple and you should do it as soon as you start playing the game; the amount of help you have resets at the Daily Reset, and otherwise if you get 5 helpers during the first Reset you’ll have access any time so you can be choosy with what material you look for, just be sure to use your help before the Daily Reset. You can get help from more than 5 people and it will list how many people helped, but the count doesn’t matter at all. 500 people count the same as 5.

To request help tap Shovelstrike Quarry’s icon, tap “enter with help from friends” and keep tapping your screen right where the “yes, please” icon appears after tapping a friend. If you place your taps just right you can constantly invite much of your friends list while barely moving your finger. Requesting help doesn’t bother your friends, in fact they’ll only even see the request if they go into the friends list manually, there is no other notification.

You’ll get a small “gift” of 10-100 Bells in your mailbox for each player you help get into the Quarry the next day. Check your Friends list to see who needs help, it costs you nothing but helps them and gives you some free bells. The amount is automatically sent from the game not the player; they don’t actually lose the Bells.

Villagers/Animals

Pocket Camp calls them “animals” but I’m going to call them Villagers out of Animal Crossing tradition. Villagers are the NPCs you can invite to your camp. The game also does not have all 333 villagers from Animal Crossing New Leaf, it has a specific and fairly limited set so far. The first set of Villagers you get is pre-set, then after a certain level (10? 20? Can’t tell yet) you get a random villager once per level from the remaining pool.

Villagers not hosted at your camp will randomly change places on the map every 3 hours (the countdown is on the Map). Make sure to make friends with new villagers ASAP as they won’t always be available on the map, but if you can invite them you have easier access to them. Villagers hosted at your camp will stay there all the time. New villagers are also the best source of Experience since the first few Friendship Levels are the easiest by far.

Each Villager has a preferred Theme; they’ll occasionally give Essence for this Theme upon level up or for completing Requests, and also require that theme’s Amenities to be upgraded past the initial cap of Friendship Level 7. Note Friendship Points earned while at the cap are lost forever, so try to raise the cap by building the Amenities as soon as possible.

Villagers have a preferred Crafting Material as well; Villagers will always give their preferred Material when a Request is completed and may give you them for free when talked to at your Camp. Villagers may give you other materials in addition, but seemingly never instead of, their preferred Material. Steel, Wood, and Cotton are common, but if you need Preserves or Paper you’ll find less villagers tend to specialize in them (fittingly, less crafting requires Preserves/Paper).

Villagers also have a special set of rewards at levels 7, 9, 15, and 20. At level 7 they’ll give you a copy of the shirt they wear and a Sparkle Stone, at level 9 they’ll give another Sparkle Stone, at level 15 they’ll enable you to craft their “favorite item” furniture, and at level 20 they’ll give you a framed picture of themselves just like Animal Crossing tradition!

Special Requests

At level 15 (or 10 for the starting Villagers), Animals will request that you craft a special item. Once reaching the required level the next time you talk to them (at the camp site or otherwise) they’ll raise the issue of the special item they want.

The Special Request is always a crafting item costing around 10,000 Bells, 150 Crafting Materials total, 4 Essences, and two Sparkle Stones. The reward is a paulty 10 Friendship points for that Animal, 1,000 Bells, 1 Calling Card 1 Request Ticket.

Craft these because you want the item, not because you want to fulfill the request, at least until you have nothing else to spend the materials on. Their friendship level isn’t limited or anything by this (only Amenities affect the cap).

Note that each Animal will give 2 Sparkle Stones for level 7 and 9, so you’re net zero sparkle stones as long as you only make each Special Request once. The Special Requests for each Animal is listed below.

If there’s any other benefit to doing this let me know, but for now it seems like a materials sink for no real benefit.

Villagers List

Overall Villagers Stats:
Total Villagers: 40
Materials: 14 give Steel, 13 give Wood, 7 give Cotton, 4 give Paper, 2 give Preserves
Themes: 11 are Cute, 11 are Sporty, 10 are Natural, and 8 are Cool

Rosie
Unlocked by default
Theme: Cute
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 10 Request: Make Up Case
Requested Items: (?)

Goldie
Unlocked by default
Theme: Natural
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 10 Request: Harpsicord
Requested Items: (?)

Filbert
Unlocked by default
Theme: Natural
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 10 Request: Space Shuttle
Requested Items: (?)

Jay
Unlocked by default
Theme: Sporty
Preferred Material: Preserves
Level 10 Request: Skateboard Rack
Requested Items: (?)

Apollo
Unlocked by default
Theme: Cool
Preferred Material: Paper
Level 10 Request: Electic Bass
Requested Items: (?)

Butch
Unlocked at level 5
Theme: Sporty
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 15 Request: Billiard Table
Requested Items:

Cherry
Unlocked at level 3
Theme: Cool
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 10 Request: Sports Car
Requested Items:

Bunnie
Unlocked at level ?
Theme: Cute
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 15 Request: Upright Piano
Requested Items:

Eloise
Unlocked at level 5
Theme: Natural
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 15 Request: Flower Display Case
Requested Items:

Lily
Unlocked at level 7
Minimum Friendship Level to invite: 3
Theme: Cute
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 15 Request: Lucky Frog
Requested Items:

Beau
Unlocked at level 6
Theme: Natural
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 15 Request: Bonfire
Requested Items:

Tex
Unlocked at level 3
Theme: Cool
Preferred Material: Cotton
Level 15 Request: Rock Guitar
Requested Items:

Punchy
Unlocked:
Theme: Natural
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 15 Request: Cat Tower
Requested Items:

Kid Cat
Unlocked:
Theme: Sporty
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 15 Request: Spherical Radar
Minimum Friendship to invite: 5
Requested items: Fruit Drink, Corral Fence, Hammock, Cable Spool, Changing Room

Chrissy
Unlocked:
Theme: Charlise
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 15 Request: Pancakes
Requested Items:

Tad
Unlocked:
Theme: Sporty
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 15 Request: Tractor
Requested Items: Rice Balls, Picket Fence, Zen Barrel, Cable Spool, Cornstalks, Friendship 5

Bud
Unlocked:
Theme: Sporty
Preferred Material: Cotton
Level 15 Request: Diver Dan
Requested Items: Cream Soda, Beach Chair, Portable Toilet, Beach Table, Surfboard, Friendship level 5

Apple
Unlocked:
Theme: Cute
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 15 Request: Juicy-Apple TV
Requested Items: Weeping Fig, Polka-Dot TV, Polka-Dot Low Table, Polka-Dot Stool, Polka-Dot Sofa, Friendship level 5

Ketchup
Unlocked:
Theme: Cute
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 15 Request: Brick Oven
Requested Items: Whole Pizza, Picnic Table, Metal-and-Wood Chair, Brown Lattice Fence, Cutting-Board Set, Friendship level 5

Maggie
Unlocked:
Theme: Cute
Preferred Material: Cotton
Level 15 Request: Greenhouse Box
Requested Items: Tin Watering Can, Pothos, Wooden Bucket,Picnic Table, Barrel Planter, Friendship 5

Carrie
Unlocked:
Theme: Cute
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 15 Request: Cradle
Requested Items: Kiddie Rug, Ringtoss, Crayons, Pastel Low Table, Toy Piano, Friendship level 5

Sandy
Unlocked:
Theme: Cool
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 15 Request: Afternoon-Tea Set
Requested Items: Cup of Tea, Serving Cart, Cacao Tree, Natural Low Table, Classic Sofa, Friendship 5

Moe
Unlocked:
Theme: Sporty
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 15 Request: Stewpot
Requested Items: Pothos, Stripe Shelf, Stripe Chair, Pastel Low Table, Stripe Bed, Friendship 7

Hopkins
Unlocked:
Theme: Sporty
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 15 Request: Giant Game Boy
Requested Items: Fruit Drink, Fluffy Rug, Round Cushion, Pastel Low Table, Laptop, Friendship 7

Rex
Unlocked: 20+
Theme: Natural
Preferred Material: Cotton
Level 15 Request: Lunch Box
Requested Items:  Lantern, Backpack, Box-Shaped Seat, Cornstalks, Picnic Table

Fauna
Unlocked at level 20+
Theme: Natural
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 15 Request: Ebony Piano
Requested Items: Aloe, Pastel Dot Rug, Pink Velvet Stool, Modern Wood Closet, Modern Wood Sofa,Friendship 7

Hamlet
Unlocked at level 20+
Theme: Natural
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 15 Request: Soccer Goal
Requested Items: Soccer Ball, Soccer-Field Rug, Portable Toilet, Green Net, Metal Bench, Friendship 7

Peanut
Unlocked at level 20+
Theme: Cute
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 15 Request: Ice-Cream Display
Requested Items: Lovely Lamp, Cypress Plant, Lovely Table, Cream Sofa, Lovely Bed, Friendship 7

Cheri
Unlocked:
Theme: Sporty
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 15 Request: Shower Stall
Requested Items: Round Mini Cactus, Flower Pop Carpet, Fruit Basket, Table with Cloth, Cream Sofa, Friendship 7

Charlise
Unlocked: 20+
Theme: Sporty
Preferred Material: Paper
Level 15 Request: Teppanyaki Grill
Requested Items: Tin Watering Can, Garden Tools, Hose Reel, Cable Spool, Cornstalks, Friendship 7

Roald
Unlocked:
Theme: Natural
Preferred Material: Cotton
Level 15 Request: Shaved Ice
Requested Items: Weeping Fig, Kiddie Rug, Kiddie Bookcase, Kiddie Clock, Kiddie Bed, Friendship 7

Agnes
Unlocked at level 20+
Theme: Cool
Preferred Material: Cotton
Level 15 Request: Kaiseki Meal
Requested Items:

Kyle
Unlocked: level 20+
Theme: Cool
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 15 Request: Mic Stand
Requested Items: Speaker, Record Box, Effects Rack, Sleek Side Table, Sleek Sofa, Friendship 7

Roscoe
Unlocked at level 20+
Theme: Cool
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 15 Request: Weight Bench
Requested Items:

Angus
Unlocked at level 20+
Theme: Cool
Preferred Material: Preserves
Level 15 Request: Streetlight
Requested Items: Fan Palm, Brown Lattice Fence, Wooden Counter, Natural Table, Simple Love Seat, Friendship 7

Peewee
Unlocked at level 20+
Theme: Sporty
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 15 Request: Butterfly Machine
Requested Items: Sleek Chair, Barbell, Djimbe Drum, Sleek Closet, Drum Set, Friendship 7

Flip
Unlocked at level 20+
Theme: Sporty
Preferred Material: Steel
Level 15 Request: Takio Drum
Requested Items: Tearoom Rug, Rice Balls, Zen Barrel, Floor Seat, Kotatsu, Friendship 7

Stella
Unlocked at level 20+
Theme: Cute
Preferred Material: Paper
Level 15 Request: Sewing Machine
Requested Items: Yarn Basket, Fluffy Rug, Casablanca Lilies, Natural Table, Natural Chair, Friendship 7

Bitty
Unlocked at level 20+
Theme: Cute
Preferred Material: Cotton
Level 15 Request: Illuminated Heart
Requested Items: Cypress Plant, Lovely Chair (Variant), Lovely Armoire (Variant), Lovely Love Seat (Variant), Friendship 7

Alfonso
Unlocked: level 20+
Theme: Natural
Preferred Material: Wood
Level 15 Request: Train Set
Requested Items:  Grass Standee, Pastel-Dot Rug, Kiddie Chair, Kiddie Dresser, Tree Standee, Friendship 7

Friendship & Inviting Villagers

Talking to and doing requests for Villagers raises their Friendship. Completing requests also earns crafting material rewards and Bells. Raising a Friendship Level gives one point towards the Player Level, an Essence for that Animal’s Theme, 3 of their Preferred Crafting Material, and 200 Bells.

You also have to raise Friendship Levels to a certain amount before you can invite them to your campsite. Check Friendship levels at any time in the Contacts menu.

When talking to a Villager if you see an option in red text, you’ll gain Friendship Points. This can be for talking, solving their request, or inviting them to the camp (only once you can meet their requirements). There’s a cooldown on when you can get Friendship Points from merely talking, it seems to be fairly short, maybe an hour or less.

The requirements to invite villagers at the start of Pocket Camp are incredibly easy, but as time goes on the number (and cost) of furniture they need you to craft and the Friendship Level they’ll require will rise.

If a villager is already inhabiting your campsite, they will give you a (small) gift every time they talk to you with red text (when you get a Friendship Point) as well.

Friendship level costs:

Level 1: 1 point
Level 2: 4 points
Level 3: 4 points
Level 4: 5 points
Level 5: 9 points
Level 6: 11 points
Level 7: 14 points
Level 8: 16 points
Level 9: 19 points
Level 10: 20 points

Level 11: 24 points
Level 12: 26  points
Level 13: 29 points
Level 14: 31 points
Level 15: 34 points
Level 16: 36 points
Level 17: ? points
Level 18: ? points
Level 19: ? points
Level 20: ? points

Inviting Villagers

You can choose to automatically place the items the Villager wants, and if you do, you can have them automatically removed after they move in (they won’t move out just because you removed the items).

Items

Furniture

Furniture has a Theme, but other than Cute items generally being assigned to Cute villagers requirements etc, it seems entirely cosmetic and non-functional. The game has no Happy Home Academy or Feng Shui so far that we can tell. A few Themes are even outside of the primary four themes in the game, and a couple only exist on a single item at present!

WIP

Purchased Furniture

Timmy and Tommy sell 3 random Furniture pieces at the Market Place, which changes on a 12-hour rotation at 1 AM and 1 PM. Timmy and Tommy’s stock appears to be identical. Anything that can be bought from the Nooks can only be bought here, not crafted.

  • Wide-Screen TV
    • 2,200 Bells
  • Cafeteria Table
    • 3,200 Bells
  • Rocking Chair
    • 1,400 Bells
Crafted Furniture

If you can’t buy it at the Nook Twins’ shop, you’ll have to have Cyrus craft it in the Crafting tab. You unlock more crafting recipes as you level up.

Special Items

Special Items are available in Cyrus’s shop and can be purchased for Leaf Tickets only, and have a limited time window where they’re available (but the game says they may re-enter rotation later). These are one of the few things truly exclusive to Leaf Tickets, though their prices are rather high ($10 through microtransactions).

Special Items also enable special NPCs to visit your camp at any time. They’re not nearly as cool as that sounds though. I got Nook and he just sleeps in his chair at all times and appears to only have three possible lines of Dialog.

Also note that only one Special NPC will be able to visit the camp at once even if you have both items.

Presently Available Special Items

Tom Nook’s Chair
Effect: Tom Nook will visit your site if this is displayed.
Cost: 250 Leaf Tickets (Roughly $10 USD worth of tickets).
Availability: Available during the first 45 days you play Pocket Camp.

Here’s Tom Nook in “action”.

K.K. Slider’s Chair
Effect: K.K. Slider will visit your site if this is displayed.
Cost: 250 Leaf Tickets (Roughly $10 USD worth of tickets).
Availability: Available during the first 45 days you play the game.

Amenities

Amenities are like Super Furniture that raise the maximum Friendship Level for all Villagers of the corresponding Theme aspect. They also increase Friendship levels by +5 for up to five random Animals hosted at your campsite. Midgame you’ll want to conserve your Cotton for the Tents, which will be essential for raising Friendship Level caps and earning Friendship Points.

Amenities should be crafted as soon as possible due to both the friendship cap and due to the extremely long Crafting time involved. Note that while only two Amenities can be placed, their effects are permanent; displaying them is only cosmetic. There is no need to “focus” your Amenities, instead it’s best to unlock Friendship caps across the board as soon as possible.

Amenities can be prioritized by how many Villagers you actually have close to the cap and/or of that theme, but a rough guideline is how common the Themes are in absolute terms: of all the Villagers, 11 are Cute, 11 are Sporty, 9 are Natural, and 8 are Cool.

For Tier 1 Amenities Cotton is going to be a major concern early in the game, so consider conserving Cotton until you have all three upgraded to level 3. For Tier 2 Amenities time is the biggest factor, try to make all 3 as soon as you can. By the time you can make Tier 3 Amenities the normal Crafting Materials and Bells costs will be minor, but the Essence costs are quite high.

Amenities receive an extra cosmetic change once upgraded to their max level (all other levels are identical to level 1 visually).

  • Generic Tent
    • Unlocked by default
    • No function
  • Cute Tent
    • 3000 Bells, 30 Cotton, 10 Cute Essence
    • Max level: 3
    • Build Time: 12 hours, 0 minutes, 12 hours
    • Raises Friendship cap to 10 for Sporty Villagers
  • Cool Tent
    • 3000 Bells, 30 Cotton, 10 Cool Essence
    • Max level: 3
    • Build Time: 12 hours, 0 minutes, 12 hours
    • Raises Friendship cap to 10 for Cool Villagers
  • Natural Tent
    • 3000 Bells, 30 Cotton, 10 Natural Essence
    • Max level: 3
    • Build Time: 12 hours, 0 minutes, 12 hours
    • Raises Friendship cap to 10 for Natural Villagers
  • Sporty Tent
    • 3000 Bells, 30 Cotton, 10 Sporty Essence
    • Max level: 3
    • Build Time: 12 hours, 0 minutes, 12 hours
    • Raises Friendship cap to 10 for Sporty Villagers
  • Tree Swing
    • Requires level 3 Cute Tent
    • 3000 Bells, 60 Wood, 20 Cute Essence
    • Max level: 5
    • Build Time: 48 Hours for first/last level, 0 minutes for the rest
    • Raises Friendship cap to 15 for Cute Villagers
  • Street Set
    • 3000 Bells
    • Requires level 3 Cool Tent
    • Max level: 5
    • Build Time: 48 Hours for first/last level, 0 minutes for the rest
    • Raises Friendship cap to 15 for Cool Villagers
    • One Villager may play guitar in the street
  • Picnic Set
    • 3000 Bells
    • Requires level 3 Natural Tent
    • Max level: 5
    • Build Time: 48 Hours for first/last level, 0 minutes for the rest
    • Raises Friendship cap to 15 for Natural Villagers
    • Up to 3 Villagers may have a picnic in the set
  • Half-Pipe
    • 3000 Bells
    • Requires level 3 Sporty Tent
    • Max level: 5
    • Build Time: 48 Hours for first/last level, 0 minutes for the rest
    • Raises Friendship cap to 15 for Sporty Villagers
  • Merry-Go-Round
    • Cost: 30 Cute Essence, 20 Cool Essence, 50 Wood, 50 Steel, 5,000 Bells
    • Crating Time: 72 Hours
    • Max level: 5
    • Requires: Level 5 Tree Swing
    • Raises Friendship cap to 20 for Cute Villagers
  • Rock Stage 
    • Cost: 30 Cool Essence, 20 Sporty Essence, ?, 5,000 Bells
    • Requires Level 5 Street Set
    • Crating Time: 72 Hours
    • Max Level: 5
    • Raises Friendship cap to 20 for Cool Villagers
  • Tree House
    • Cost: 30 Natural Essence, 20 Cute Essence, 50 Wood, 50 Steel, 5,000 Bells
    • Crating Time: 72 Hours
    • Requires Level 5 Picnic Set
    • Max level: 5
    • Raises Friendship cap to 20 for Natural Villagers
  • Pool Set
    • Cost: 30 Sporty Essence, 20 Natural Essence, 100 Steel, 5,000 Bells
    • Crating Time: 72 Hours
    • Requires Level 5 Half-Pipe
    • Max level: 5
    • Raises Friendship cap to 20 for Sporty Villagers

Clothes

Different Clothes can be bought as soon as you unlock the Market Place. Close crafting is “coming soon” as in not in the game at all yet.

Clothes are sold randomly in the Market on a 12-hour rotation (resetting at 1 AM and 1 PM from what I can tell). Mable sells shirts and dresses, while Labelle sells hats and accessories. Kicks sells socks and shoes.

Clothing has a Theme, but like Furniture Themes it seems entirely cosmetic and non-functional. The game has no Happy Home Academy or Feng Shui so far that we can tell.

Clothes

Sold by Mable.

Accessories

Sold by Labelle.

  • Small Sik Hat
    • 2,400 Bells
Footwear

Sold by Kicks.

Shoes

 

Socks

 

Collected Items

Pocket Camp refers to items like apples, fish, coral, and all the junk you pick up to fulfill requests as “Collected Items”.

Collected Items have a shared cap of 100 items total (plus 5 more spaces every few levels). Items all take 1 unit of space. Collected items are all used for Requests, and can also be sold either in game (for a low base price) or sold in your Market Box to other players for any price you choose (it’s up to other players whether to buy).

Note that since Fish/Bugs are now Collected Items, they do not have special times of day they appear at; in Pocket Camp all bugs/fish appear at all times of day and in any season at present.

If you pick up too many items, you’ll be prompted to sell or Market Box some items to make room. I usually just sell some Sea Shells as they’re very easy to find more of and somewhat uncommon as Request items.

You should always complete requests when you can, as your Collected Items inventory overflows fast and the Request rewards are always worth more than what you hand in.

You can buy 5 more Collected Items slots for 20 Leaf Tickets. The max count of slots is 150 without spending Leaf Tickets or 250 after spending 400 Leaf Tickets.

If you want to keep a safe buffer of Collected Items for upcoming Requests I recommend keeping at least up to 10 of every Common Bug/Fish, 5 of every Rare fish, and 3 of every Shell and Coconuts. Keep every fruit that’s not from Lost Lure Creek, the LLC fruits you’ll end up with too many of so sell them in Market Box. Super Rare Fish/Bugs should be sold immediately; their only use is to sell for bells. Do not sell them in Market Box, no one will buy them.

Fruit

Coconuts are found on Sunburst Island and Saltwater Shores, and other Fruit is only found in Breezy Hollow and to a lesser extent Lost Lure Creek. Breezy Hollow will have one of each Fruit tree, while Lost Lure Creek has 2 trees that have different fruits for each player.

This means you’ll end up getting more of 2 specific fruits than most people due to your Lost Lure Creek spawns, so you’ll often be able to sell that type of fruit more readily.

Fruit respawns 3 hours after shaking the tree. Once per day a random non-fruit tree will drop 300-1,000 Bells as well, much like in the main series.

Pear
Common
Found at: Breezy Hollow, Lost Lure Creek
Base Cost: 10 Bells

Peach
Common
Found at: Breezy Hollow, Lost Lure Creek
Base Cost: 10 Bells

Orange
Common
Found at: Breezy Hollow, Lost Lure Creek
Base Cost: 10 Bells

Apple
Common
Found at: Breezy Hollow, Lost Lure Creek
Base Cost: 10 Bells

Cherry
Common
Found at: Breezy Hollow, Lost Lure Creek
Base Cost: 10 Bells

Coconut
Common
Found at: Sunburst Island, Saltwater Shores
Base Cost: 10 Bells

Bugs

Bugs are only found on Sunburst Island, caught with the Net. Honey can be used to respawn them faster but it’s not necessary. Bugs respawn even without leaving the map (but they won’t spawn in your field of view).

Bugs can be scared away if you walk too close to them, but the radius is much more forgiving than regular Animal Crossing.

Tiger Butterfly
Common
Base Cost: 10 Bells

Monarch Butterfly
Common
Base Cost: 10 Bells

Fruit Beetle
Common
Base Cost: 10 Bells

Horned Dynastid
Rare
Base Cost: 100 Bells

Miyama Stag
Super Rare
Base Cost: 1,500 Bells

Jewel Beetle
Super Rare
Base Cost: 2,500 Bells

Emperor Butterfly
Ultra Rare
Base Cost: 3,000 Bells

River Fish

River Fish can only be caught at Lost Lure Creek. Fish respawn even without leaving the map (but they won’t spawn in your field of view).

Fish can’t be scared away because of your running, unlike in normal Animal Crossing. They only flee if you attempt and fail to catch them. If you see a large fish shadow here be sure to catch it; only Rare fish have large shadows at Lost Lure Creek!

Pale Chub
Common
Price: 10 Bells
Shadow: Extra Small

Yellow Perch
Common
Price: 10 Bells
Shadow: Medium

Crucian Carp
Common
Price: 10 Bells
Shadow: Small

Black Bass
Rare
Price: 100 Bells
Shadow: Large

Rainbow Trout
Super Rare
Price: 1,500 Bells
Shadow: Large

Koi
Ultra Rare
Price: 4,000 Bells
Shadow: Large

Ocean Fish

Ocean Fish are only caught at Saltwater Shores. Fish respawn even without leaving the map (but they won’t spawn in your field of view).

Horse Mackerel
Common
Price: 10 Bells
Shadow: Small

Squid
Common
Price: 10 Bells
Shadow: Medium

Olive Flounder
Common
Price: 10 Bells
Shadow: Large

Red Snapper
Rare
Price: 100 Bells
Shadow: Medium

Blowfish
Super Rare
Price: 1,500 Bells
Shadow: Medium (?)

Footballfish
Ultra Rare
Price: 3,000 Bells
Shadow: Medium (?)

Tuna
Ultra Rare
Price: 5,000 Bells
Shadow: Huge (?)

Seashells

Seashells are only found at Saltwater Shores. Shells are abundant in number yet fairly rarely needed as Request materials, so if you have to sell something to make space they’re a good first choice.

Coral
Common
Price: 10 Bells
Found at: Saltwater Shores

Conch Shell
Common
Price: 10 Bells
Found at: Saltwater Shores

Scallop Shell
Common
Price: 10 Bells
Found at: Saltwater Shores

Crafting Materials

You have a per-item maximum for each kind of Crafting Material, though it’s mostly an encouragement to level up as by level 30 you’ll have up to 999 of each item. Still, you should keep crafting new things as soon as crafting slots and materials allow.

Every 5 levels between 10 and 30 you get a higher storage cap. Max count is noted in ascending order. It’s good to get to at least level 10 pretty quickly so storing Crafting Materials never becomes too big an issue.

Crafting Materials differ in rarity, but they’re all earned by requests, Friendship Levels, or things like Log-In rewards or Goals. Shovelstrike Quarry also has a rotating Crafting Material reward so you can use it to farm a specific type if you have friends to unlock it.

Essences can be earned from requests/Friendship levels with characters of that Theme aspect, rarely as Gifts from hosted Villagers, and at Shovelstrike Quarry. You can, but shouldn’t, sell crafting materials by tapping them in the Crafting Material menu.

Sparkle Stones
Use: Rarest crafting material. Very hard to get, but even a basic request may yield one.
Max count: 999

Friendship Powder
Use: Used in various more expensive Crafting items
Max count: 999/9999

Cute Essence
Use: Used in Cute Amenities
Max count: 30/50/150/500/750/999

Natural Essence
Use: Used in Natural Amenities
Max count: 30/50/150/500/750/999

Sporty Essence
Use: Used in Sporty Amenities
Max count: 30/50/150/500/750/999

Cool Essence
Use: Used in Cool Amenities
Max count: 30/50/150/500/750/999

Wood
Use: Basic material for assorted crafts
Max count: 200/300/500/750/999

Preserves
Use: Basic material for assorted crafts
Max count: 200/300/500/750/999
Only Jay and Angus regularly give Preserves, making it the hardest to get Crafting Material. It’s also used fairly rarely.

Cotton
Use: Basic material for assorted crafts
Max count: 200/300/500/750/999

Steel
Use: Basic material for assorted crafts
Max count: 200/300/500/750/999

Paper
Use: Basic material for assorted crafts
Max count: 200/300/500/750/999
Only Apollo, Charlise, Kid Cat, and Stella  regularly give Paper, making it fairly rare. It’s not used much outside of Wallpaper, but those usually require a whole 150 each.

Camper

The Camper can be upgraded and repainted by the Blackbirds at OK Motors. The Camper is also the main money-sink in the game; if you hold off on Loans, expensive Paint Jobs and Carpets/wallpaper for the Camper, you’ll never want for Bells. Thus I find it best to save up until I can immediately pay off the loans with room to spare, to avoid perpetually being low on cash.

Camper Upgrade Prices

Camper Upgrades must be done in order, and are paid for after doing them just like house upgrades in the main games. Bet you ingrates won’t hate on the Blackbird trio as much as you did Tom Nook, hm?

  • Default
    • Floor Space:  4×5(?)
  • Expand First Floor
    • 10,000 Bells
    • Floor Space: 4×6
  • Second Floor
    • 30,000 Bells
    • Floor Space: 4×5
  • Expand Second Floor
    • 50,000 Bells
    • Floor Space: 4×6
  • Expand First Floor Again
    • 100,000 Bells
    • Floor Space: 5×6
  • Expand First Floor Max (?)
    • 150,000 Bells
    • Floor Space: 5×8
  • Expand Second Floor Again
    • 200,000 Bells
    • Floor Space: 5×6
Camper Paint Jobs

There are both Special and Custom paint jobs you can get at OK Motors. New jobs can be manually tweaked and cost 5,000 Bells for every time, and cost the same whether you want to change Camper style or not. The paint job is effectively “free” if you want to change Camper style as well, as it also costs 5,000 bells to change style and get a paint job.

If you purchase a Special Paint Job you can re-select it at any time at OK Motors, so don’t worry about changing from a special one.

Note the Special paint jobs are very expensive. Some cost Leaf Tickets.

Camper  Special Paint Jobs
  • Animal Crossing
    • Vintage Style
    • Log-In bonus: Play the game for 10 days
  • Lovely Lace
    • Vintage Style
    • 8,000 Bells
  • Blue Sweater-Vest
    • Vintage Style
    • 8,000 Bells
  • Camo Chic
    • Vintage Style
    • 8,000 Bells
  • Splatter Up
    • Modern Style
    • 10,000 Bells
  • Baker’s Dozen
    • Modern Style
    • 10,000 Bells
  • Playtime
    • Modern Style
    • 10,000 Bells
  • Patched Together
    • Vintage Style
    • 150 Leaf Tickets ($6 USD)
  • Flower Power
    • Vintage Style
    • 150 Leaf Tickets ($6 USD)
  • Retro Ride
    • Vintage Style
    • 150 Leaf Tickets ($6 USD)
  • Flaming Forward
    • Modern Style
    • 150 Leaf Tickets ($6 USD)
  • Lumberjack
    • Modern Style
    • 150 Leaf Tickets ($6 USD)
  • Garden Party
    • Modern Style
    • 150 Leaf Tickets ($6 USD)

Leaf Tickets & Premium Items

Request Tickets

Request Tickets add +3 Friendship Points and allow you to take another 3 Requests from a non-hosted Villager after completing their initial three. The time until the villager moves stays the same, so don’t waste them on Villagers that may move before you can finish the request. You can only use three per character per day.

These are useful to farm a specific crafting material; wait for a Villager that has a Preferred Material you need a lot of, then use your Request Tickets on them. Alternately, it’s a fast way to raise Friendship for a specific villager.

You may want to save up Request Tickets until Villagers hit level 10, when they start to give double base Crafting Materials (6 instead of 3). At 15 they start to give triple base Crafting Materials.

Calling Card

Calling Card forces a Villager to visit one of the areas around your camp immediately for 3 hours, outside of the regular 3-hour rotation. Once there they’ll act like a normal visiting Villager, able to be talked to and give requests. They’ll also get +2 Friendship Points for being called.

You can use Request Tickets to get the most out of the Villager you used a Calling Card on. Calling Cards are rarer than Request Tickets.

Leaf Tickets

Leaf Tickets are your bog-standard “Premium Currency” in Animal Crossing Pocket Camp, meaning the game gives you a taste of them early on to get you hooked, makes them fairly hard to earn for free, and otherwise expects you to pay with real money to get them otherwise.

As always, paying Premium Currency in a mobile game is nearly a scam, something only Whale (or more accurately nobody) should do. Just wait for the timer, you’ll live, and the Leaf Tickets are better spent elsewhere. Instead, save your Leaf Tickets for permanent unlocks, such as the Crafting Spaces or Special Items in the crafting store. I recommend getting the Crafting Spaces as soon as you can as their prices aren’t crazy (you’ll get enough tickets for free in a couple days) and you’ll definitely use them as some crafting can take several hours.

Leaf tickets speed up crafting by a measly 10 minutes per ticket, which is an incredible waste; do not spend them in this way (except spend 1 just to get the Stretch Goal reward for spending them).

The free Leaf Tickets are largely earned through completing Goals in-game as well as occasionally in the Log-In bonus. You should assume your free Leaf Tickets are limited and budget them well if you don’t play to buy more, and buying more seems unnecessary unless you really want all the Special furniture.

Special Furniture appears to be the main “hook” for selling the In-App Purchases. They’re very expensive compared to the free tickets you get.

Ways to spend Leaf Tickets, ordered roughly in order of most to least “worth it” in my subjective opinion:

  • Crafting Slots
    • 80 Tickets, max of 2 extra
    • This is the best way to spend your early tickets, as it’s a massive, permanent help for very, very few tickets
  • Inventory Slots
    • 20 Tickets for 5 slots
    • Max of 20, or 100 slots total for 400 Leaf Tickets
      • Enables a total of 250 Inventory Slots
  • Market Box Slots
    • 10 Tickets, max of (?) extra, at least 20
  • Special Items
    • 250 Tickets each (~$10!). Very expensive and cosmetic only, but they’re permanent and unique. Depends how much you value them.
  • Crafting without required materials
    • One ticket for every 2 missing materials. You need so many materials long term this seems like a shortsighted way to go.
  • Honey/Nets
    • 20 Tickets per net/jar. IMO also not very worth it
  • Fertilizer
    • 5 Leaf Tickets. Very bad way to spend.
  • Speeding up Crafting
    • One ticket per 10 minutes of crafting time.  A complete waste of tickets.
      • Roughly $10 to remove a single 48 hour timer, of which there are many.
      • Playing games like this, you’re just going to have to deal with the timers. Trying to spend them away would take hundreds/thousands of dollars.

Estimated total count of free Leaf Tickets:

  • 100 Link Nintendo Account
  • 50 Free My Nintendo Rewards
  • 500 Level Up rewards (assuming max level 50)
  • 235 Misc Stretch Goals
  • 31 Login Bonus (after 10 days)
  • 916 Total free Leaf tickets

Goals & Rewards

Goals

Like lots of mobile games, Animal Crossing Pocket Camp has an Achievement system that gives an in-game reward for learning the game or performing arbitrary tasks Pocket Camp wants to incentivize. Tap the Isabelle icon on the main screen or in the More menu to see your daily/long-term goals.

Timed Goals

Daily quests effectively, these list a specific reward and condition and change every day. You’ll get three per day and there’s no extra bonus for doing all three. They usually give Crafting materials and include actions like collecting certain objects or giving Kudos to other players.

There will always be a Timed Goal to give people Kudos that awards Friendship Powder (now with more Friends!™), so it’s good to complete that since Friendship Powder is otherwise fairly uncommon to come by. Other rewards won’t be very amazing, but they’re usually easy enough.

Stretch Goals

Stretch Goals are important as they give you a fairly large supply of Leaf Tickets and Essence that are otherwise hard to obtain. These are tasks that help you learn how to play Pocket Camp anyway, so if at any point you’re unsure what to do, find a Stretch Goal you can complete and get to work! All the info you need to complete Stretch Goals is in the goal list itself; none are hidden or anything.

Achievements

Nothing particularly interesting for Achievement Hunters here. Pocket Camp has Google Play Achievements, one for every 5 levels up to level 30 (which is not max level). Achievements are easy to get and come with no ingame reward. You can check your Achievements with the Google Play Achievements option in the Miscellaneous menu of the More tab.

  • Planting the Seed
    • Reach level 5
    • 500 XP
  • Putting Down Roots
    • Reach level 10
    • 1,000 XP
  • Growing Tall
    • Reach level 15
    • 1,500 XP
  • Branching Out
    • Reach level 20
    • 2,000 XP
  • Adding Rings
    • Reach level 25
    • 2,500 XP
  • Touching the Sky
    • Reach level 30
    • 3,000 XP

Log-In Bonus

Collected daily (day starts at 1 AM), Log-In bonuses are stored in your Mailbox for only a week; make sure to claim them from the Mailbox when getting them. There are two sets of log-in bonuses that you claim.

Rotating Log-In bonus

These bonuses look like they switch up every week and offer very light rewards, such as up to 1 Leaf Ticket or Essence. Not really worth logging in just to get (doing even one Request is better in almost all cases) but hey, free stuff.

Special Log-In Bonus

This is a long-term login bonus where all players will be getting these items. This set includes exclusive items. You get items from both sets of Log-In bonuses each day.

  • Veggie Basket
  • 10,000 Bells
  • Alpinist Dress
  • 10 Leaf Tickets
  • Birdcage
  • 4 Request Tickets
  • 20 Leaf Tickets
  • 2 Calling Cards
  • Alpinist Hat
  • Animal Crossing Camper Special Paint Job
    • This item is not applied automatically, you’ll have to go to OK Motors and check the Special Paint Job inventory to apply it. It is free once unlocked however and can be reapplied at any time for free.

My Nintendo Rewards

It’s only out in Australia so see info here about changing your existing Nintendo Account to Australia for Pocket Camp if you’re not in that region. Once connected you can access both rewards and missions from the My Nintendo button in More Options.

Linking My Nintendo accounts is permanent so you likely to NOT want to create an Australian My Nintendo account to link your game to just to claim these!

The rewards include an exclusive outfit and surprisingly generous Crafting Material rewards, so linking an account is recommended.

  • OK Motors Cap
    • 300 Coins
    • One time purchase
  • OK Motors Jacket
    • 300 Coins
    • One time purchase
  • 50 Leaf Tickets
    • Free
    • One time purchase
  • 5,000 Bells
    • 100 Coins
    • Repeatable purchase
  • 20 Cotton
    • 50 Coins
    • Repeatable purchase
  • 20 Steel
    • 50 Coins
    • Repeatable purchase
  • 20 Wood
    • 50 Coins
    • Repeatable purchase
  • 20 Paper
    • 50 Coins
    • Repeatable purchase
  • 20 Preserves
    • 50 Coins
    • Repeatable purchase

And here are the methods by which you can earn Platinum coins in Animal Crossing Pocket Camp. They’re all pretty easy and the rewards are good, so I recommend making quick work of them.

  • Link to a Nintendo account
    • 300 Coins
    • One time only
  • Link to a Facebook Account
    • 300 Coins
    • One time only
    • You can do this from the Add Friend option in the Friends menu
  • Link to a Twitter account
    • 300 Coins
    • One time only
    • You can do this from the Add Friend option in the Friends menu
  • Complete 10 Villager requests
    • 30 Coins
    • Weekly
      • Weekly rewards appear to reset on Monday
  • Complete 50 Villager requests
    • 50 Coins
    • Weekly
  • Complete 100 Villager requests
    • 100 Coins
    • Weekly

Animal Crossing Pocket Camp My Nintendo rewards

Animal Crossing Pocket Camp My Nintendo platinum coin tasks

Animal Crossing Pocket Camp FAQ

Error: Support Code 802-7609 when I try to play

Best I can tell, this is just the game being overloaded from the launch rush. Hopefully this should clear up soon. You may also get support code 802-9808, 802-5809, or 802-9009. All seem to be related to the server load. Wait a few hours and try again.

Closing the app and reopening makes it work sometimes, but if you keep disconnected even then I’d just wait. It should be sorted out soonish.

What’s your Friend Code?

I had to remove it from the guide due to the friend cap! If you need to friend me for some reason related to improving the guide, ask in the comments.

What’s Different From Standard AC Games?

If you’re a long-time Animal Crossing fan, there are a few expectations you’ll have that don’t hold true in Pocket Camp.

Town Variation

First off, Pocket Camp plays more like a “standard” single player, progression-based game. Everyone starts with the same Villagers, unlocks the same new Villagers each specific Level Up, everyone has access to all Fruits off the bat, and as far as I can tell there’s no “item set” for the shop like usual in AC either.

This eliminates some of the personal vibes of Animal Crossing and would seemingly give less reason to visit/play with friends, but there are other incentives/reasons to play with friends in Pocket Camp.

Progression

This is a much, much more “progression” based game than Animal Crossing with all the standard bells (heh) and whistles dangled over your head to keep you going. You can to a degree do most of the usual Animal Crossing things, shop, fish, get fruit, but if you don’t work towards leveling stuff you are definitely missing out on unlocks.

No Time of Year/Day stuff

At least so far, Animal Crossing Pocket Camp doesn’t appear to do any of the usual Animal Crossing stuff where characters/events/items vary by the time of day, week, year, etc. This again ties into it being a more progression-based, standard game-type game.

There’s no fish/bug catalog or museum

It sucks. There’s also no puns when you catch a fish. No Museum to store them in either. And no Blathers to blather. If I could change just one of these “not like normal Animal Crossing” things, it’d be this.

Menus are Real Menus

Something I always actually rather didn’t like was how Animal Crossing makes 90% of menus into a dialog with a character at a specific location. For the most part, menus are just menus you use from the Apps in your ingame phone. This means things like changing your appearance, checking your Catalog, and managing your inventory can be done really quickly. Again it could be said to lose a bit of the personal charm, it does make it more convenient though.

How ‘Persistent’ is this ‘Persistent Connection’ Requirement?

Pretty persistent. It won’t quite force-quit the game the second you lose signal, but you won’t be able to complete requests, catch Rare Fish, change areas, or open certain menus while connection is lost. You can pretty much only wander around the area you’re currently in and collect any Common Collected Items around while you wait for signal.

Where is my REAL Animal Crossing game?

Mobile dev teams and console dev teams are almost never the same. AC Switch is probably be worked on as we speak and likely has zero to do with Animal Crossing Pocket Camp at all.

Animal Crossing Pocket Camp just crashes after talking to KK (support code 802-5874)?

Animal Crossing Pocket Camp appears to crash if it detects rooting/jailbreaking, Nintendo mobile games tend to do this for anti-cheating/piracy. I can’t help you circumvent that (not sure it’s even possible!).

You missed (thing)!

Thanks for letting me know! Submit any info I’m missing, questions, or requests for clarification in the Comments below.

Linking A My Nintendo Account To Pocket Camp

If you want to have Cloud Saves (for if your device explodes or something) and use My Nintendo Rewards in the game, you’ll need to link a My Nintendo account. You do not have to make a new, fake Australian account, you can link your real account you use with your Nintendo Switch/3DS/Wii U/other Nintendo mobile games!

At least from a US My Nintendo account, this was significantly less painful than I expected.

These are the only hitches I experienced:

  • Your Nintendo ID (Wii U/3DS/Miiverse account) will be temporarily unlinked. You can relink once you switch regions back.
  • You will be logged out of everything, multiple times. Be absolutely sure you have all your passwords in order.
  • You cannot have a remaining eShop balance so you’ll need to spend it.
    • I recommend finding a nice Indie game on a platform you own, like Axiom Verge or one of the Dark Witch series games.
    • Buy games until you’re required to add missing funds with Credit Card/paypal, this is about the only way to get it to balance to exactly zero. Using Gift Cards is unlikely to hit exactly zero.
  • Your Nintendo Switch account will briefly have the Australian Store for your user. Previously downloaded games and the like will still be active and playable on your account.
  • Users under the age of 18 may have additional issues due to parental consent/etc.
  • Moving back to United States while Pocket Camp is still in Australia-only release will temporarily remove the missions from your list and cause sign-in failures in the game.

Note this process is reversible, though if you reverse it right now you’ll lose the benefits of linking Pocket Camp to a Nintendo account; you won’t be able to sign in, presumably it won’t save to the cloud, and Missions will not work. If you switch back to Australia again all your progress will still be there, however.

To change your My Nintendo Account region, merely log into accounts.nintendo.com, click Edit on Profile, tap Country, and pick Australia (only Australia can link to Animal Crossing Pocket Camp at the moment). Tap Save and you’ll get some confirmations to go through.

As mentioned above, you’ll be stopped if your eShop balance is not zero, so spend any remaining funds. An easy way is to buy a game more expensive than your balance and add only exactly the necessary funds via Debit/Credit Card/PayPal/etc to reach 0 after the purchase.

You will also have to unlink your Nintendo ID, which is only used for Miiverse (which is dying), 3DS and Wii U. This shouldn’t matter to you much as you’ve spend your eShop funds in the last step, and you can re-link them later when you’re done.

After confirming you’ll have to re-login on your Nintendo Switch if you want to use it online but you should be able to log into your Nintendo Account on Animal Crossing Pocket Camp! You’ll now have cloud saves and can access the rewards/missions listed in the My Nintendo Rewards section! Have fun!

Some people have talked about needing an Australian credit card—I have no idea what they’re talking about, this wasn’t required for me at all. I do have a PayPal account linked (not Australian though). If you are somehow blocked for this reason, try adding a PayPal account for your region (not Australia) and see if it lets you go. If anyone’s had this trouble let me know the exact details.

If you don’t have Paypal linked and don’t have problems, let me know too so I know it’s completely not required.

Addendum

If you enjoy Animal Crossing Pocket Camp you may be interested in my review of Animal Crossing Happy Home Designer for 3DS.

If you don’t have the game and want to see it in action, I have an Animal Crossing Pocket Camp Quick Look here.

A datamine of the game has spoilers for potential future features.

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