SuperDimension Neptune vs Sega Hard Girls Guide

Majorly work in progress! See my Import Guide below or try Google Translate on this Japanese Wiki if you find something missing for now. I’m still working on writing it, but questions/corrections in the comments are always welcome of course.

Welcome to SuperDimension Neptune vs Sega Hard Girls!

You might have first heard of it as  Super Dimension War Neptunia VS Sega Hard Girls Dream of Coalescence Special AKA Cho Jigen Taisen Neptune VS Sega Hard Girls Yume no Gattai Special AKA 超次元 大戦 ネプテューヌVSセガ・ハード・ガールズ 夢の合体スペシャル AKA I really wish they’d offically announce an English name at the same time as Japanese because pre-english coverage of this game is a mess!

Is it Good?

I’ll have a full review coming on this site soon. But it’s the best side game so far (almost as good as a Rebirth series game I would say), though it has some flaws. I’d recommend it for any fans of Neptunia or big fans of Sega Hard Girls for sure.

I have a playlist on Youtube with a nearly complete English playthrough already if you want some impressions and gameplay.


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12 Things You Might Not Know About PSVR

I’d like to address some common myths or concerns I’ve seen about PSVR (and in some cases, VR in general).

Is PS4 Pro Necessary?

I firmly believe PSVR launched before PS4 Pro to help break this illusion, but no, PS4 Pro is not required/expected for a good experience in VR. Most games still look and work great on a standard PS4 (the only way I’ve played PSVR myself).

So no, PS4 Pro isn’t required for a good experience here. It might be nice, but I don’t feel like I’m missing much before it’s out.

Are PSVR Framerates Bad?

Related to the Pro myth, no, framerates on current PSVR games are fine. Some are 60 FPS, but due to Frame Reprojection they feel seamless themselves. The only “jitter” I’ve noticed in VR is when Move or DS4 controllers pop out of camera range, the actual head tracking and animation have been smooth in every game I’ve played. I honestly can scarcely tell the difference in framerate between Thumper (90 FPS) and most of the 60 FPS experiences personally.

Of course, it’s always possible for someone to release a game with poor performance. But this far, sony and/or devs have done a great job keeping frames intact.

Forget what you know about 30 FPS-targeting console games. VR games are a different target platform with different minimum expectations. Thus far, devs understand the importance of framerate, and I don’t see that going away.

I Can’t See 3D/3DS 3D Doesn’t Work For Me

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Three Days in Virtual Reality – PSVR Impressions

VR finally arrives, after what’s felt like an eternity. Starting with the Oculus Rift kickstarter (which I had neither the faith nor the spare cash to back) I’ve been waiting for Virtual Reality, and it’s finally here, in a moderately economical form in PSVR.

I’ve tried out VR briefly in the form of Google Cardboard, as a proof of concept it was powerful, but it really just made me want to get some “real” VR gear. Samsung Gear VR was never for my phone, and Vive and Oculus were a bit out of my price range. Hence PSVR came to be my first headset.

This is by no means exhaustive (I’ve only played about half of the games/experiences I own so far), but here’s a look into my first few days trying VR.

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Steam’s New Review Policy Causes More Problems Than It Solves

Today, Steam did something. That alone is a monumental occasion. But unfortunately, as is too often, Steam either didn’t think very hard about what it did or didn’t care very much about the developers on its platform when it did it.

You see, Steam decided to unilaterally demote all reviews posted by anyone who activated a product on Steam via a Steam Key. Some people think this is good. Since I wrote an article and I’m already sounding snippy, you can probably tell I do not think it was good.

There’s cries that people who paid money have “less biased” opinions, cries that Kickstarter backers are like “investors” and shouldn’t have a say, that review copies are “free keys” and shouldn’t be eligible for, erm, review. All of these are incorrect or downright stupid and I’ll cover them one by one. But first, let’s account for who can actually get a Steam Key and why.

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Fan Games Are No Less Protected Than Fan Art By IP Laws

Or: It’s Time To Stop Defending Nintendo Unless You Hate Fan Art Too.

(This article is available in an expanded, podcast-style form as well, on YouTube.)

A common refrain when a fan game is taken down is that it’s within Nintendo’s rights. Do you know what else is within Nintendo’s rights? Sending DMCA takedowns to every single OC Remix track based directly on Nintendo’s music. What else is within Nintendo’s Legal Rights That Are Totally Always Okay To Enforce?

Say Nintendo read every article about Cosplay and sent a DMCA notice to have the pictures taken down and demanded that the cosplayer never again display or create a costume based on a Nintendo character. Is that cool with you? Because it’s not actually any different than fan games, legally speaking.

How about Nintendo sends DMCAs to the millions of pieces of Nintendo character fan art spread across Deviant Art, Pixiv, Twitter, Tumblr, everywhere? Because they could do that. Legally.

Remixes, fan art and yes, even cosplay are derivative works. The only legal difference between them and fan games is that corporations don’t go after them.

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On Fandom: Criticism Need Not Be Hatred

I’ve noticed an unfortunate thread of commentary on my Youtube videos, and more generally in the gaming public. And I’m getting tired of it, because not only is it personally exhausting to read, it’s that sort of insidious, self-propagating way of thinking that taints almost all discussion about entire topics.

The world of game criticism is a very hostile and silly place right now, and we could do a lot better by understanding our own biases and thinking about them just a bit. In the hopes of doing so, here’s some examples of some rather strange comments I got, insisting I hate things I explicitly state I liked in the same breath.

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The Finer Points: Scripted Losses are Bad Game Design

I’ve ranted on Twitter a couple times about scripted losses in games, and a fair number of people still seem to think they’re pretty decent ideas, so I thought I’d get into the meat of what makes them poor design. The bottom line is they violate too many of player’s expectations in a lot of ways developers probably don’t even realize—like many issues in gaming, it’s really easy to overlook when you know what’s going on, but when you don’t, hoo boy.

Losing Sucks

So this isn’t news. But I think game devs underestimate just how a sudden loss can affect players. Allow me to tell you a story from my youth. From the ancient times, when all games were pixels, and “multiplayer” often meant taking turns in a single-character platformer or just plain ol’ watching a friend play a single player game all day.

I was playing Chrono Trigger with a friend on my Playstation, a bit late to the game. He had beaten the game on SNES before I had even played, but he didn’t want to spoil the game so I was going in fairly blind. The only RPG I had played before this was Super Mario RPG, at that same friend’s house. I never owned a copy.

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